One book leads to another...

Wednesday, September 7, 2022

IWSG Sept 2022 Doing it Again

 


Welcome readers, writers, authors, and bloggers!

We’re glad you’re here! It's the First Wednesday of the month; when we celebrate IWSG Day in the form of a blog hop featuring all of the members of the Insecure Writer's Support Group. Founded by author Alex Cavanaugh (Thank you, Captain!) and fostered by like-minded associates, IWSG is a comfortable place to share views and literary news from our perspective writing desks as we record our journeys. Check out the September newsletter here

Our awesome co-hosts this month are: Kim Lajevardi, Cathrina Constantine, Natalie Aguirre, Olga Godim, Michelle Wallace, and Louise - Fundy Blue!

Did anyone (besides me) not know that revising your work after publication is acceptable in some cases?! You can cover your astonishment by resting your chin in your hand. It worked for me.

Yet, I digress.

According to Mental Floss.com at least five of the most iconic authors  have revised and republished their work, including Mary Shelley (Frankenstein), George Elliot (Middlemarch), and Joan Lindsay (Picnic at Hanging Rock) to name a few.

I know what you’re thinking: “She’s doing it again. That name-dropping thing.”  Why, yes. It’s what I do ;-)

As to this month’s Optional Question:  “What genre would be the worst one for you to tackle and why?”

I could never write in the medical thriller genre. I would never even try. Why? Much as I enjoy a good medical mystery, they also scare me half to death. Besides, can you imagine the amount of research it would take to sound like you know what you’re talking about? I mean, what if an actual doctor or nurse decided to read your book? Fiction (as opposed to reality) has to make sense, right?

Truth is, most medical thriller authors do have a degree in the medical field, and almost no one ever plans to write a book about the profession. Writing is usually an afterthought and typically an aside.

For instance, Tess Gerritsen, a general physician, began writing her first book while on maternity leave. An avid reader, her first novels were romantic thrillers. Her breakout medical thriller “Harvest” was inspired by a conversation with a retired detective and was followed by three more New York Times bestselling novels before her first crime thriller “The Surgeon” led to a television series called Rizzoli and Isles. 

At least a couple thrillers by Robin Cook depict fictional accounts of his experiences as a medical intern.

Patricia Cornwell may not have a medical degree (she does have a B.A. in English), but she was a technical writer for the Chief Medical Examiner of Virginia for six years in addition to volunteering with the Richmond Police Department – and this was before her “Scarpetta” series was ever published. Cornwell is also known as a capable cartoonist and a talented athlete on the tennis court. Whew!

Do you know who else doesn’t have a medical degree? Me. And I’m okay with that ;-)

What genre would be the worst for you to write in? What genre would be the easiest for you to write in?

Be happy. Write well.

 

“Make the most of yourself. For that is all there is of you.” ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson




Wednesday, August 3, 2022

IWSG August 2022 Original Hooks and Generous Lines

 


Welcome readers, writers, authors, and bloggers!

We’re glad you’re here! It's the First Wednesday of the month; when we celebrate IWSG Day in the form of a blog hop featuring all of the members of the Insecure Writer's Support Group. Founded by author Alex Cavanaugh (Thank you, Captain!) and fostered by like-minded associates, IWSG is a comfortable place to share the views and literary news from our perspective writing desks as we record our journeys. Check out the August newsletter here

Our awesome co-hosts for this month's posting of the IWSG are:  Tara Tyler, Lisa Buie Collard, Loni Townsend, and Lee Lowery! 

This month’s optional question is: When you set out to write a story, do you try to be more original or do you try to give readers what they want?

Unless it is a sequel or part of a series, I'm not thinking of the reader when I set out to write a new story. Yet. My routine is writing, editing, revising, repeating, then revealing. Reader reviews will come soon enough. And they don’t mind letting us know ;-)

One sweet reader I call Goldilocks contacted me regarding the ending to Cotton’s Place before she’d finished reading the book, “Blue’s not gonna die, is he?” Bless her heart. I’ll never tell. But does Goldilocks dictate the ending? Are we writing the story or am I? Do I care what she thinks? You bet I do. And I’m elated that since she likes this character so much, there’s a good chance she’ll love the ones she hasn’t met yet ;-)

Last month was a bit crazy, so I’ve got some catching up on visiting to do this month. See ya around!

Oh! One more thing:

Q: Why, even on the hottest of days, do writers always feel chilly?

A: They are surrounded by drafts.

  


Wednesday, July 6, 2022

IWSG July 2022 Choice Worlds

 




Welcome readers, writers, authors, and bloggers!

We’re glad you’re here! It's the First Wednesday of the month; when we celebrate IWSG Day in the form of a blog hop featuring all of the members of the Insecure Writer's Support Group. Founded by author Alex Cavanaugh (Thank you, Captain!) and fostered by like-minded associates, IWSG is a place to share the fabulous views and exciting news that occurs along our fascinating writing journeys. Check out the July newsletter here.  Perusing the many tips and resources offered here is definitely worthwhile and highly rewarding, so pull up a comfy chair, or better yet -  join us!

Our awesome co-hosts for this month's posting of the IWSG are:  J Lenni Dorner, Janet Alcorn, PJ Colando, Jenni Enzor, and Diane Burton!

This month’s optional question is:  If you could live in any book world which one would you choose?

Only one? My first choice (operative word being “world”) would be “Camino Island” by John Grisham. I’d want to be a part of the compelling storyline; peopled with authentic characters I wouldn’t mind knowing, in an ideal coastal setting featuring a charming avantgarde with a dream job. What’s not to like? When the story ended, as they’ve a tendency to do, I’d stay on in a room with a breathtaking view of unyielding storms propelled upon the mainland by an indifferent sea. I’d hang around long enough to watch sea turtles hatch on the beach, along with a couple hundred other spectators.

Before long, I’d have to return to the Sonoran Desert where a 3-day old character named Quinn Quicksilver appeared swaddled in a blanket at dawn one day on a desolate stretch of Arizona highway. Quinn’s story doesn’t involve living in a world so much as an epic journey through one in route to an uncertain future while in search of his unknown past. Who doesn’t enjoy a good adventure now and again?

Can’t wait to read other responses to this month’s optional question!

Until again, be happy, write well!

 


Wednesday, June 1, 2022

IWSG - June 2022 A Place at the Table


Welcome readers, writers, authors, and bloggers!

We’re glad you’re here! It's the First Wednesday of the month; when we celebrate IWSG Day in the form of a blog hop featuring all of the members of the Insecure Writer's Support Group. Founded by author Alex Cavanaugh (Thank you, Captain!) and fostered by like-minded associates, IWSG is a place to share the fabulous views and exciting news that occurs along our fascinating writing journeys. Check out the June newsletter here.  Perusing the many tips and resources offered here is definitely worthwhile and highly rewarding, so pull up a comfy chair, or better yet -  join us!

Our awesome co-hosts for this month's posting of the IWSG are:  SE White, Cathrina Constantine, Natalie Aguire, Joylene Nowell Butler, and Jacqui Murray!

This month’s optional question is:  When the going gets tough writing the story, how do you keep yourself writing to the end? If you have not started the writing yet, why do you think that is and what do you think could help you find your groove and start?

Actually, I think I’ve finished the final chapter of my last WIP. But that’s the problem, I only think so.  I think it’s time for fresh eyes. Do you ever feel that way?

It’s fairly breezy here in the woods as I write. At times it’s as if an onery angel is determined to smother the splendor of spring in celebratory yellowcake dust.  I hope we don’t have another pollen squall while I’m out here. Moreover, I hope I remember to save my post before slamming my laptop closed if we do. But, isn’t technology fantastic? I learned a valuable lesson about the importance of page numbers after once having to chase loose papers, snatched away by a gust of wind and strewn all over the yard. Gone are the days of using writing utensils as flyswatters, in case they land in the dog’s water bowl 😊 My only concern today is having to plug in my laptop before I’m ready to go inside, and what will become of the little black ant that ambled across my keyboard letters A through D before slipping under the F? Might words like fluffy, flaffler, and carfuffle be the death of him?

In an article in last week’s issue of Publishing Trends, I read (among other topics, of course) that women readers and (more to the point) women writers over the age of 45 are being dismissed by the very industry we support and rely on. I’m just going to pretend I didn’t read that and that the unacceptable practice is gone like trash after collection day. Chances are it will be. Especially considering recent campaigns aimed at streamlining the page-to-screen pipeline whereby authors are increasingly the people Hollywood wants to be friends with. Granted, not everyone has jumped on the bandwagon…yet. But it’s nice to imagine a time when authors have a significant place at the (screen) publishing table.

It's Audiobook appreciation Month! Have you created one yet? I’m not yet convinced, but I’m getting there. Do you check out free audio samples before choosing what to read next?

Don’t miss the full Strawberry moon on the 14th

Until again, be happy, and write well!

  

Wednesday, May 4, 2022

IWSG May - Highs and Lows





Welcome readers, writers, authors, and bloggers!

We’re glad you’re here! It's the First Wednesday of the month; when we celebrate IWSG Day in the form of a blog hop featuring all of the members of the Insecure Writer's Support Group. Founded by author Alex Cavanaugh (Thank you, Captain!) and fostered by like-minded associates, IWSG is a place to share the fabulous views and exciting news that occurs along our fascinating writing journeys. Check out the May newsletter here.  Perusing the many tips and resources offered here is definitely worthwhile and highly rewarding, so pull up a comfy chair, or better yet -  join us!

Our awesome co-hosts for this month's posting of the IWSG are:  Kim Elliott, Melissa Maygrove, Chemist Ken, Lee Lowery, and Nancy Gideon!

This month’s optional question is:  May 4 question - It's the best of times; it's the worst of times. What are your writer highs (the good times)? And what are your writer lows (the crappy times)?

I am happiest when I’m writing. I’m even happy when stuck at a pivotal crossroads; one make-or-break decision away from almost home (The End) or following a path to the second half of a burgeoning novel. Either way is fine with me ;-)

Rejection is always a bummer. But scams are worse. They leave you feeling lower than dirt. Question everything, and be safe out there folks.

It’s Children’s Book Week! Have you one you’d like to mention? Do you have a childhood favorite?

Do you celebrate Cinco de Mayo?

Don’t forget to call your mom on Sunday ;-)

Have an A-May-zing month of May! 

It's a Beautiful Day

Saturday, April 30, 2022

A to Z Blogging Challenge - Z

 


A to Z April (2022) Blogging Challenge

 

Hello, dear readers!

I’d like to thank you all in advance for stopping by, and I hope that at least a few on my list of remarkable buildings pique your interest as they did mine.

“Design is not a coincidence or a formula; it is a result of human reflection and vision in response to a specific challenge.” ~ Unknown

 

Z

Zimmerman House


One of only two Usonian homes (the other is right down the street) in Manchester, New Hampshire, this home was designed almost entirely with the personal tastes of the homeowners in mind. By 1952 Frank Lloyd Wright had established his signature Usonian style in homes intended for middle-class families with modest requirements and was expanding the use of reinforced concrete in residential applications such as flooring.


For the Zimmerman couple, Wright’s attention to detail extended to include exterior garden design, interior furnishings, a small music stage, and to some extent, dishware.


The Zimmermans willed the home to the Currier Museum, which has maintained the grounds since 1988 and hosts tours for about 5000 visitors per year. Howard Mansfield was one such visitor.


 

An unusual home, undeniably. What do you think? Would you take a tour?

Many thanks to everyone who stopped by! You kept me at it ;-)

Friday, April 29, 2022

A to Z Blogging Challenge - Y

 



A to Z April (2022) Blogging Challenge

 

Hello, dear readers!

I’d like to thank you all in advance for stopping by, and I hope that at least a few on my list of remarkable buildings pique your interest as they did mine.

“Design is not a coincidence or a formula; it is a result of human reflection and vision in response to a specific challenge.” ~ Unknown

 

Y

Yountville Town Center



When it came time for an upgrade, the architects at Siegel and Strain knew just how to design a building that would seamlessly blend old and new, nature and architecture in the heart of Napa Valley’s wine country. As a result, the Yountville Town Center received the 2010 “Savings by Design” award of honor, AIA California’s highest award.


If I were to spend a day strolling this 1.5 square mile town, I’d hope to catch an event going on at the center, wouldn’t you? 

Thursday, April 28, 2022

A to Z Blogging Challenge - X

 


A to Z April (2022) Blogging Challenge

 

Hello, dear readers!

I’d like to thank you all in advance for stopping by, and I hope that at least a few on my list of remarkable buildings pique your interest as they did mine.

“Design is not a coincidence or a formula; it is a result of human reflection and vision in response to a specific challenge.” ~ Unknown

 

X

San Xavier Del Bac

 


Founded in 1692 by Padre Eusebio Francisco Kino, this Spanish catholic mission was named for Francis Xavier, a Christian missionary and co-founder of the Society of Jesus in Europe. The original church served the mission and the O’odham people along the Santa Cruz River until about 1770 when it was destroyed by Apache raids.

The (new) mission that still stands today was commissioned with funds borrowed from a Sonoran rancher and constructed largely by native O’odham workers under the guidance of architect Ignacio Gaona between 1783 and 1797.

Following Mexican Independence in 1821, the Mexican government banned all Spanish-born priests. Once the last Franciscan departed in 1837, operations at the mission began to deteriorate.

The mission might have succumbed to decay by 1853 if not for the Gadsden Purchase which included San Zavier as part of the United States and the new Arizona Territory. The Diocese of Tucson was then formed, putting in place a priest and establishing services once again.

One of the finest examples of Spanish colonial architecture in the US, the San Zavier Mission is considered to be perhaps the best and oldest civilized structure in Arizona.

I’ve been to the mission many times and highly recommend a visit. Would you go? Have you been?

Wednesday, April 27, 2022

A to Z Blogging Challenge - W

 


A to Z April (2022) Blogging Challenge

 

Hello, dear readers!

I’d like to thank you all in advance for stopping by, and I hope that at least a few on my list of remarkable buildings pique your interest as they did mine.

“Design is not a coincidence or a formula; it is a result of human reflection and vision in response to a specific challenge.” ~ Unknown

 

W

Wayfarer’s Chapel


The design of this place of worship may seem familiar, even similar to the one I showcased for the letter “H,” but there’s more to it than that, as this chapel was designed by architect Lloyd Wright (son of famed American architect Frank Lloyd Wright).

While in keeping with his father’s love of glass, Wright departed from the traditional use of masonry in order, he said, “to achieve a delicate enclosure that allows the surrounding landscape to define the sacred space.” Placing his unique design on a cliff overlooking the Pacific Ocean further compliments an already breathtaking effect.

Also known as “The Glass Church,” it is a popular choice for weddings and movie and television series settings. In addition, the American a cappella group, Pentatonix recorded a music video there in 2020.


If ever there was a perfect place to find – or lose yourself, this has to be it. Can you imagine the view from the pews? Would you visit? Have you been?


 

Tuesday, April 26, 2022

A to Z Blogging Challenge - V

 


A to Z April (2022) Blogging Challenge

 

Hello, dear readers!

I’d like to thank you all in advance for stopping by, and I hope that at least a few on my list of remarkable buildings pique your interest as they did mine.

“Design is not a coincidence or a formula; it is a result of human reflection and vision in response to a specific challenge.” ~ Unknown

 

V

Villa Savoye - France


Commissioned by the Savoye (pronounced Savwa) family as a country retreat just outside of Paris, France, architects Le Corbusier and (his cousin) Pierre Jeanneret had free range to design this modernist villa.

The Villa Savoye is undoubtedly Le Corbusier’s most notable project from the 30s and had an enormous influence on international modernism. His use of Pilotis (stilts), interior and exterior ramps instead of stairs, garden roof and terrace, horizontal ribbon windows, and an open floor plan devoid of load-bearing walls were all part of the “Five Point” architectural aesthetic that led to the house being affectionately referred to as a “Box in the Air” by the architect himself.

Interestingly, the building was registered as an official French Historical Monument (1965) while Le Corbusier was still alive.


It might be fun to tour this place. Would you go? Have you been? What do you think of the design?

Monday, April 25, 2022

A to Z Blogging Challenge - U

 


A to Z April (2022) Blogging Challenge

 

Hello, dear readers!

I’d like to thank you all in advance for stopping by, and I hope that at least a few on my list of remarkable buildings pique your interest as they did mine.

“Design is not a coincidence or a formula; it is a result of human reflection and vision in response to a specific challenge.” ~ Unknown

 

U

Unity Temple – Oak Park, Illinois


When the original Unity Church was struck by lightning and burned to the ground in 1905, noted American architect and loyal parishioner Frank Lloyd Wright was awarded the commission for a new building.

In keeping with his philosophy of organic architecture and a woefully tight budget, Wright submitted a design that defied nearly every concept of traditional church architecture.

Concrete, he reasoned, was both plentiful and affordable and allowed for repetition of a series of un-treated concrete forms that, to the busy street outside, would represent impenetrable protection of the sanctuary within.

Instead of a steeple or spire, Wright’s vision included the use of natural lighting; leaded glass skylights intended to impart “a sense of a happy cloudless day… “and a continuous band of clerestory windows that minimized street noise while providing further light.


The project was deemed another of a long list of masterpieces by the architect. And because the design is so unique, bearing no resemblance to other churches along Lake Street, parish commissioners decided to change the name to Unity Temple.

 

I bet the sanctuary truly is something to see. Would you visit? Have you been?

Saturday, April 23, 2022

A to Z Blogging - T

 


A to Z April (2022) Blogging Challenge

 

Hello, dear readers!

I’d like to thank you all in advance for stopping by, and I hope that at least a few on my list of remarkable buildings pique your interest as they did mine.

“Design is not a coincidence or a formula; it is a result of human reflection and vision in response to a specific challenge.” ~ Unknown

 

T

Tovrea Castle at Carraro Heights


Italian immigrant and businessman Alessio Carraro hired Phoenix architect H.D. Frankfurt to design a “Boutique” Hotel that would attract buyers for a proposed 48-home subdivision he planned to call “Carraro Heights,” evidently without any intention of following the architect’s plan, as he instead pursued his own dream of a medieval Italian castle.

Besides the concrete basement, ascending floors are elongated octogons stacked on top of one another, each smaller than the one below, giving the building its colloquial “Wedding Cake” appearance.

The castle opened to festive fan-fare just after Christmas of 1930 – and right before Carraro realized his newest neighbor owned a stockyard, the sight, and smell of which could very well deter any prospective home-buyers. But then again, after the stock market crash, there might not be any home-buyers anyway.

The economy worsened before it got better, and Carraro was forced to give up his dream before ever breaking ground on the subdivision. His real estate agent accepted a (low-ball) bid from the highest bidder.

I can only imagine Carraro’s thoughts when he realized the highest bidder was his neighbor, E.A. Tovrea, the cattle mogul. Tovrea’s wife, Della, loved the castle so much that she moved right in and lived there until she passed away in 1969. She chose the basement as her main living area because there is no central cooling, and it gets hot in Phoenix, Arizona.

I’m glad that to this day, both the original builder and the longtime owner’s names are used in the title of this Historic Landmark. In addition, the castle is highly visible from surrounding areas, portions of the freeway, and several flight plans in and out of Sky Harbor airport.

Is it just me, or does this plaster ceiling look like icing on a cake?

The views alone are worth the tour, and the guides are engaging! Would you go? Have you been?

Friday, April 22, 2022

A to Z Blogging Challenge - S

 


A to Z April (2022) Blogging Challenge

 

Hello, dear readers!

I’d like to thank you all in advance for stopping by, and I hope that at least a few on my list of remarkable buildings pique your interest as they did mine.

“Design is not a coincidence or a formula; it is a result of human reflection and vision in response to a specific challenge.” ~ Unknown

 

S

Singing Tower Carillon


Nearly as fascinating as this 205-foot neo-gothic art deco building is the man who commissioned its creation. Dutch-born American editor and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Edward Bok was editor-in-chief of Ladies Home Journal for 30 years, subtly ensconcing his own ideas for American architecture, home furnishings, town buildings, and (if you can believe it) his disdain for women’s suffrage. Nonetheless, of Bok’s autobiography, one reviewer stated (in part) that Bok had been “Aesthetically probably the most useful citizen who ever breathed its muggy air,”

 

In perhaps a bold move in 1924, Bok’s wife Mary Louise founded The Curtis Institute of Music in honor of her late father. Three years later, construction began on Bok’s monument to music and nature atop Iron Mountain, north of Lake Whales, Florida.

 

Designed by famed architect Milton Medary and crafted by noted stone sculptor Lee Lawrie, the Singing Tower houses one of the world’s finest 60-bell carillons (concerts in the garden at 1 and 3:pm daily). The Bells of Singing Tower

Among historical photos and documents located on Level Two is the original guest register signed by President Calvin Coolidge and Edward Bok in February of 1929.

Samuel Yellin, America’s premier metalworker at the time, crafted the Great Brass Door on the north side of the tower, which depicts the Book of Genesis, starting with the creation of light and ending with Adam and Eve being ousted from the garden at the hand-crafted wrought iron gates.  

 


I've added this to my list of things I want to see in Florida! Would you visit?

Thursday, April 21, 2022

A to Z Blogging Challenge - R

 


A to Z April (2022) Blogging Challenge

 

Hello, dear readers!

I’d like to thank you all in advance for stopping by, and I hope that at least a few on my list of remarkable buildings pique your interest as they did mine.

“Design is not a coincidence or a formula, it is a result of human reflection and vision in response to a specific challenge.” ~ Unknown

 

R

Rosenbaum House

 


The first of dozens of Usonian homes designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Rosenbaum house is the only one located in Alabama and employs many of Wright’s signature features such as the L-shape, steel cantilevered roof, and mainly natural building materials. One of the more distinctive elements is the characteristic use of floor-to-ceiling glass – whenever and wherever possible or practical - to “blur the line between indoors and outdoors,” as one periodical describes it, and as evidenced by exit doors in every room. The Rosenbaum House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978 and is the only Usonian home (to date) open to the public.

I find the similarities of this house to the one the Byrds of “Ozark” live in fascinating. So much so that I actually checked to be sure, and while they’re both genuine and cool as rain, they are two different houses. It matters not to me; I just love windows!

Nice place for a house with glass walls, don’t you think? Would you visit? Have you watched the “Ozark” drugs-and-crime drama series?

 


Wednesday, April 20, 2022

A to Z Blogging Challenge - Q

 


A to Z April (2022) Blogging Challenge

 

Hello, dear readers!

I’d like to thank you all in advance for stopping by, and I hope that at least a few on my list of remarkable buildings pique your interest as they did mine.

“Design is not a coincidence or a formula, it is a result of human reflection and vision in response to a specific challenge.” ~ Unknown

 

Q

Queen Sofia Palace of the Arts

 


Widely considered one of the most beautiful opera houses in the world, at 17 stories high Queen Sofia is also the tallest opera house and cultural center in the world. Designed by internationally known Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, the sweeping mosaic roof is undeniably the most impressive part of this landmark located in Valencia City, Spain (birthplace of the architect.) In keeping with a nautical theme, the innovative upswept wing-like design allows spectators to watch rehearsals through glass panels from boat-like opera house “decks”.

Well, I am impressed! How about you? Have you been? Would you visit?

 

 


Tuesday, April 19, 2022

A to Z Blogging Challenge - P

 

A to Z April (2022) Blogging Challenge

 

Hello, dear readers!

I’d like to thank you all in advance for stopping by, and I hope that at least a few on my list of remarkable buildings pique your interest as they did mine.

“Design is not a coincidence or a formula, it is a result of human reflection and vision in response to a specific challenge.” ~ Unknown

 

P

Petronas Towers

 


Known as the world’s tallest twin towers since 1996, the Petronas Towers are a major landmark in Kuala Lumpur and are visible pretty much throughout the entire city. While 88 stories are not the highest in the world, the honorable distinction lies in the “Tallest Twin Towers” status.

Designed by Argentine-American architect, Cesar Peli, the postmodern style was intended to create a 21-century icon for the city. In addition to a large shopping mall and the Petronas Philharmonic Hall below, the towers provide 580 thousand meters of column-free office space to several high-profile companies such as IBM and Reuters.

The double-decker skybridge is the highest two-story bridge in the world and connects the towers at the 41 and 42nd floors. It is not attached to the towers, instead designed to slide in and out to prevent breakage, as the towers sway in high winds. The skybridge is also considered a safety device in case evacuation is necessary from one tower to the other. It is open to the public but tickets are sold on a first-come basis.

Notable events include a new world BASE jumping record set by Felix Baumgartner in 1996 (possibly since broken,) by jumping off a window cleaning crane, and after two failed attempts that ended in arrest, French urban climber Alain “Spiderman” Robert scaled the top of Tower 2 in just under 2 hours using only his bare hands and feet, without the use of any safety devices.

Awesome to look at, wouldn’t you say?